School Districts Can Help Students Adopt New Attitudes About Admission Process

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Editor’s note:  A version of this post was originally published on Admitted in December 2016. It’s being republished as part of NACAC’s Best of the Blog series. 

School districts may be able to boost college-going rates by changing the way they introduce students to the application process, according to an article published by the Harvard Business Review.

Too often, the conversation is focused on ensuring students submit an application to at least one college, writes researcher Lindsay Page. But when teens apply to a range of institutions “they are more likely to get accepted to an institution that is a good fit,” she notes.

Continue reading School Districts Can Help Students Adopt New Attitudes About Admission Process

Parenting Your College Student: Navigating New Terrain Over Winter Break

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Editor’s note:  A version of this post was originally published on Admitted in January 2019. It’s being republished as part of NACAC’s Best of the Blog series. 

The Class of 2023 will soon be home from college for their first winter break and many parents are seeing a new dynamic in their relationship with their children.

These college freshmen have just had their first taste of independence and striking the right balance can be tough for families.

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Join Us Wednesday for a #NACACreads Twitter Chat

Which self-care strategies and healthy habits can help students make the most of their journey to and through college?

Read When Likes Aren’t Enough: A Crash Course in the Science of Happiness and join us on Wednesday (Dec. 11) for a special #NACACreads Twitter chat focused on student mental health and well-being.

The discussion, featuring author Tim Bono, will include opportunities for participants to share their own insights, tips, and more.

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New College Guide Available to Support Indigenous Students

A new college-going guide created for Native students by Native students is now available.

The 36-page Indigenous College Planning Guidebook was published by the College Board this fall and features advice and insights from Native college students regarding the admission process.

The free resource includes information about college prep programs, scholarships, and on-campus resources aimed specifically at Native students. It also offers step-by-step instructions to help students select challenging high school classes, apply for financial aid, and complete college applications.

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Gen Z Seeks Greater Flexibility in Higher Ed

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One in five.

That’s the number of Gen Z students who, according to a recent national survey, say they may choose not to attend college.

“They see a college degree as perhaps not necessary for future jobs, and they’re worried about racking up student debt,” Marvin Krislov, president of Pace University (NY), writes in a recent op-ed published by Forbes.

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Now Available: New Podcast Episode

The latest episode of College Admissions Decoded is now available! Listen on NACAC’s website or Apple Podcasts.

“Avoiding the Parent Trap: A Common-Sense Approach to College Admission,” features NACAC members sharing tips for parents on how to be effective and supportive throughout the admission process.

Tune in and share with the students and families you serve!

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Funding Will Soon Expire for Programs Serving Students with Cognitive Disabilities

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College programs serving students with intellectual disabilities face an uncertain future, according to The Hechinger Report.

Across the nation, 281 colleges offer transition programs for young people with cognitive disabilities, such as Down syndrome. But federal funding that has helped finance many of the programs expires next year, forcing colleges to search for other options.

Some of the programs — which provide tailored academic and occupational training — “are looking to nonprofits or foundations for support, while others are considering scaling back staffing or raising fees,” Cate Weir told The Hechinger Report.

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Over 130 Colleges Now Offer Addiction Recovery Programs

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As opioid abuse rises to epidemic levels, a growing number of US colleges have started to provide sober living and treatment programs.

According to a recent Inside Higher Ed article, over 130 colleges and universities in the US now offer drug and alcohol recovery services for students. As recently as 2012, only 35 colleges offered such programs.

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Despite Enrollment Dips, International Student Population Climbs

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The number of international students in the US hit an all-time high of 1.09 million in 2019, despite enrollment dips at the undergraduate, graduate, and non-degree levels, according to new data from the Institute of International Education (IIE).

The overall gain was primarily due to increased participation in the US Optional Practice Training (OPT) program, which allows international students to work in the country after completing their degree.

Continue reading Despite Enrollment Dips, International Student Population Climbs

Daily updates on NACAC and the world of college admission counseling. For more information about NACAC, visit nacacnet.org.